Oftentimes, when talking with other bisexual people, we lament how difficult it was to deal with coming out as bisexual. It carried with it not only the difficulty of explaining our sexuality to straight people, but the pain of rejection from the majority of “LGBT” and queer organizations, groups, and social circles that mainly catered to gays and lesbians.

But, compared to many bisexuals in my friend group, I’ve never had as difficult of a time as they did adjusting to the baggage of bisexuality of being seen as conniving, shadowy, opportunistic, untrustworthy, and having most of my underlying motivations driven by greed. It’s not as though I’m an easygoing person who takes being mistreated in stride, but I somehow never reacted quite as angrily to it as my friends did when they came out.

“It bothers me, believe me it does,” I said to a friend tonight. “But, I’ll be honest, it’s not anything I’m not used to. I have a lifetime experience of being treated that way because I’m Jewish.”

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